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We are glad to say that Patrick Davison has won the Goldsmiths’ Fair 2016 Best New Design Award (Week Two) for Box: a container, an object and a sculpture, only 50mm tall and with a fascinating and intricate surface’s pattern made of silver, brass, copper, bronze, and nickel silver (alpaca).

Patrick Davison Goldsmith Fair Box

Box, fine silver,sterling silver, copper, bronze, nickle silver, brass,  2015

 

Patrick Davison Goldsmith Fair Box

Who is Patrick Davison

A student of Alchimia in the past, and a contributing faculty today, Patrick is a jewellery designer whose practice is defined by a process-led work which incorporates silver and mixed metals.

He studied at the Glasgow School of Art and at Alchimia Contemporary Jewellery School in Florence with Ruudt Peters. After graduation he returned to Kent in England and set up his workshop where he continues to work. He began to develop his own work exploring a variety of gold and silversmithing techniques and complementing this personal practice with work in jewellery workshops.

 

necklace-2016

Necklace, silver, shibuichi, 2015

jar-lid-on

Porphyry, box, silver, shibuichi, bronze, brass copper, 2014

p1210211

Box (oval), silver, nickel silver, 2014

walls-of-the-churchof-the-temple-vase

walls of the church/of the temple, vessel, silver, nickel silver, bronze, brass, copper, 2014

brooches

Brooches, all from 2016

Patrick Davison - Glosmiths' Fair

Box, silver, Fine silver, Bronze, Brass, Copper, 2016

Goldsmiths’ Fair

Goldsmiths’ Fair is one of the most important events for contemporary jewellery of the UK, organized every year by the Goldsmith Company.

For over two weeks 150 independent makers, from young talents to more established professionals, from all over Britain are selected by a panel of experts to present their work in this context.

For more information please visit: https://www.goldsmithsfair.co.uk

Patrick Davison

Mixed-Metal Techniques

July 6-10, 2015

 

Patrick Davison in his workshop in London

Patrick Davison in his workshop in Kent

This workshop will be focused on the amazing mixed -metal techniques, that Patrick Davison is using in his own work.

The process will be studied in depth to explore its structure and follow the evolution in order to arrive to new and surprising combinations and patterns.

Patrick Davison, jar, mixed metal

Patrick Davison, jar, mixed metal

By preparing special metal alloys and their specific solder as well as using familiar metals such as Silver, Brass or Copper, a vast range of combinations will be explored.  By the end of the workshop each student should have made his/her piece of jewelry in this magnificent technique.

The duration of the course is 5 days and 30 hours, the cost is 700€ + 22% Vat tax

 

Patrick Davison, Jar

Patrick Davison, Jar

This is Patrick’s second workshop in Alchimia. The first one part of the Alchimia MFA program was a great success and the students were enthusiastic about Patrick’s endless patience and passion.

Patrick Davison studied at the Glasgow School of Art and at Alchimia Contemporary Jewellery School in Florence. After graduation he returned to Kent in England and set up his workshop where he continues to work. He began to develop his own work exploring a variety of gold and silversmithing techniques and complimenting this personal practice with work in jewellery workshops.

Patrick Davison, plate

Patrick Davison, plate

Patrick currently works part time for Award winning Goldsmith Jesper Velling and as  technician at the Royal College of Art in London.
His work has been shown at Design Miami/Basel in 2014 and 2015 with Galleria Antonella Villanova.

detail of plate

detail of plate

with Patrick Davison

A workshop introducing mixed metal work, focusing on the use of wire with introductions to sheet and tubing.
November 2014 for the third year BFA.

Patrick Davison, borrowed Box, mixed metal

Patrick Davison, borrowed Box, mixed metal

Wire  –  Wire  making  is  at  the  core  of  any  jewellers  practice,  and  its  use  in  mixed metal  work  is  endless.
We  will  use  two  types  of  soldering  and  I  will  use  the  terms
outside  and  inside  soldering.
Outside  soldering  is  applying  the  solder  after  the wire  has  been  formed,  and  inside  soldering  is  working  the  solder  with  the  wire,
during  the  forming  process.  Both  are  valuable  depending  on  the  work  required.

IMG_2126

Most of the work we did was using wire, twisting different metals and different alloys together or weaving them like a fabric into sheets.
We then used Solder to bind these together, this is where I used the term inside and outside soldering.
Outside where the solder is applied after the wires were twisted, and inside is where the solder has been drawn into wire and woven into the fabric like the other wires.
We looked at both techniques an the pro and con of each method. (I made these terms up, they are not technical terminology! )

IMG_2110

Solder  –  Making  solder  is  very  useful  for  the  metal  worker,  it  can  save  time  and money  but  can  also  be  an  interesting  journey  into  understanding  alloys.  Further experimentation  can  lead  to  finding  solders  suitable  for  certain  tasks  and  a richer  understanding  of  the  soldering  process.

IMG_2070

Sheet  and  tubing
Sheet  and  tubing  can  be  used  in  mixed  metal  work  in many  ways.  It  is  useful  to  be  able  to  make  tube  accurately  as  this  can  be  used with  the  sheet  both  made  with  wire,  and  perhaps  mixed  metal  sheet  work  to further  develop  the  working  process.  Where  this  is  concerned  there  is  no substitute  for  experimentation.

IMG_2100

Combining  techniques
This  demonstrates  the  endless  variations  and opportunities  that  working  with  mixed  metals  can  provide.  By  making  a  material using  one  method,  then  combining  it  with  another,  or  repeating  a  process  over and  over,  can  open  up  new  avenues  to  explore.  It  can  also  refine  the  final  result of  the  piece,  but  perhaps  can  also  complicate  it  unnecessarily,  diluting  the  final result.  This  is  down  to  the  individual  to  judge  and  explore.

IMG_3080

Experimentation  not  only  finds  new  outcomes  for  the  process  but  also  refines the  understanding  of the  making  procedure  leading  to  predicted  and  controlled results.

In conclusion some examples of the extraordinary work of Patrick Davison.

Patrick Davison, jar, mixed metal

Patrick Davison, jar, mixed metal

 

Patrick Davison, Jar, mixed metal

Patrick Davison, Jar, mixed metal

 

Patrick Davison, Jar lid, mixed metal

Patrick Davison, Jar with lid, mixed metal

 

Patrick davison, dish, mixed metal

Patrick Davison, dish, mixed metal

 

 

11 artists, 9 nationalities, 7 languages , come together in the exhibition titled PURUS, the Latin root of the word pure(puro/pur), an untainted representation of perfection, naturalness, and concentration.

Andrea Coderch Valor

It all started with 333 yellow trees, 250 portraits, 99 towers of Babel, and many other experiments aimed to lead each student to the essence of his/her artistic language.

Patrick Davison

The results of this research, guided by Ruudt Peters are presented in PURUS,

Sam Hamilton

with Christoph Zellweger curating the eleven collections.

Izabella Petrut

Not all is pure and white, we actually did not want to refer to verginity and pure whiteness –

what we were thinking about was the fully colored and energy cramped double word purpur (in German) purpure in French – the color of the Gods, The Pope and the Cardinals, the only missing color in the spectrum of the rainbow. The color of power, of wealth of absolute transition……

Valentina Caprini

But at the end the word Purus/Pure leads to white in one way or the other, to white as the absence of color or the  presence of all colors together.
Each of us has his  individual vision of the colored world that cannot be shared…..

Giulia Savino

It has been hard to work for the whole year on this vision, to reach the pure essence of the individual artistic language.
For some it seemed easier but in reality it was not,
each of us has to struggle to get there;
it is not an easy task

Dinah Lee

All of them did really good work at the end, for some it was harder- but it will maybe reach further,
this is the value of getting on in slow motion

Catalina Gibert Nadal

to learn to speak your own artistic language is a challenging task, someone wanted to quit half way, but it was not allowed and the results  show that it was worth while.

Anna Helena Van de Pohl de Deus

 

Weronika Marek

 

and the emptiness has been filled

 

Andrea Coderch Valor

Ji Yang Lee