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It’s not easy to advice jewelry maker Carla Movia. Not easy because she mostly knows and plans everything before you were even asked. She does research, she studies possibilities. She knows what has preceded her and has very strong esthetic opinions on contemporary jewelry and its different threads. She reads, she sees a lot, and is very well informed. She is hungry of a particular type of knowledge, and she perfectly knows what she is looking for. Nomen Nescio, the exhibition coming out of her 2 years research during the MFA program at Alchimia, and essentially an installation of 300 brooches, shows exactly all of that.

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The pieces highlight a uniqueness amongst the mass, hence the decision to show them in grids was a very smart one. Instead of creating chaotic crowds of pieces shown throughout the space, this type of display setting gives the visitor the chance to really care and look for the details and the differences between them.

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Each piece came with its own “passport”: literally a sort of identity document for the pieces, giving information about them, such as their names, materials, leaving space to document their journeys and speak of their future owners. This gives the pieces a political tone, one that speaks of citizenship and sense of identity.

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As we always suggest at Alchimia: do make good edition pieces. Here you can see how several in fact were sold. Please note that this can be your little contribution to society: Carla decided to donate a percentage of the sales to Oxfam, a confederation of NGO’s working on the alleviation of global poverty.

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The exhibition was held in a very beautiful private space not far from the school. This is not the best choice in terms of audiences as of course this means the space itself won’t bring in a crowd. On the other hand the esthetic result has been just what Carla was looking for. In one way or the other we find ourselves almost always having to make some compromises.

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As always, and again and again, friends play a major role in setting up an exhibition. Be always sure to check their schedule, not only yours, when planning a date.

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The ornament is a very rich and complex cultural phenomenon. The need for decoration and ornamentation has always been an essential part of mankind, from the earliest civilizations until the present day. The ornament is present in every discipline of the Arts, and closely related to the world of jewellery, in which the need to decorate the body forms the main reason for its existence. A piece of jewellery is always an ornament, but an ornament is not always a piece of jewellery.

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The ornament can have a symbolic, aesthetic or social function since there is an intimate relation between ornaments and the way people express their life. Feelings of joy, lust and grieve are all materialized in ornaments. Although being attacked for the first time in history in the early 20th century by the architect Adolf Loos and by the philosophy of the modernists, the ornament clearly survived and has now proven to be a subject for contemporary developments in both Fine Art and Design.

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During the course the students will investigate the origin of the ornament, its meaning and full potency. The students will be encouraged to connect the world of jewellery with other disciplines, and to search for a relation between the past and the present. Through short exercises and assignments, both individual talks and group discussions the students will develop a personal and contemporary vision on the ornament which will have to result in finished pieces.

I strongly believe every student has to become aware of the relation between the mind, the heart and the belly during the creative process. To form a strong and personal vision, concentration and deepening is necessary. During the workshop the students will be challenged to go the whole way with an idea, to stretch it as far as it can go.

The workshop will take place from July 11 to 15, 2017.

For more information write to: info@alchimia.it

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Evert Nijland is a Dutch jewelry maker. His work has been exhibited in solo and group exhibitions world-wide, including in the Galerie Rob Koudijs, Galerie Louise Smit, Coda museum, Gorkums Museum, Textielmuseum and Stedelijk Museum (NL), Galerie Spektrum and Cranach Haus, Museum fur Kunst und Gew,  Internationale Handwerksmesse ‘Schmuck’(DE), Oratorio di San Rocco (IT), Cheongju International Craft Biennale (KR), Fondation Bernardaud (FR), MAD Museum (USA), Victoria & Albert Museum (UK) among many more. He is the recipient of several awards among the many the Dutch Design Prizes and The Sotheby’s Award and his work has been acquired by public collections such as the Nationaal Zilvermuseum, Nederlands Textielmuseum, MMK Museum, Coda Museum and Stedelijk Museum (NL), Mima, Middlesbrough Intitute of Modern Art and Victoria & Albert Museum (UK), Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Museum of Arts and Design, New York and the Mint Museum of Crafts & Design, Charlotte NC (USA).

 

 

written by Aniya Dunkley

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Akis Goumas, bracelet “shell”, forged silver, wires Flickr, Bracelets Cuffs Bangles, 2015

Just before the Winter holidays, the second-year MFA students of Alchimia participated in a three-day workshop in Anticlastic Raising (a technique of metal forming whereby a sheet of metal is formed directly with a hammer on a sinusodial – snakelike – stake) based on ancient Greek concepts and techniques.  The course was taught by Akis Goumas, a Greek jewelry designer by trade who also works with a team of archeologists studying and researching prehistoric metal technology in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens.  Akis, who has been designing and making jewelry for over 35 years, emphasizes the importance of understanding the journey a piece of jewelry takes through the process of its making. He believes strongly in the power of our rational and logical thinking, in the idea that we all have the ability to teach ourselves how to make things through a careful consideration of the materials we already have at our disposal and what our desires for an object are.

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Over the three days, students learned how to design and create tools made of raw wood and metal, and then realize three (or more) anticlastic pieces of jewelry, ranging in size and dimension. This was meant to guide the students towards an understanding of the proper functions and uses of the tools they use, and how to personalize and shape them in relation to both themselves and the objects they imagine to create.

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Each student walked away with its own specially-designed hammer, etching pens and tweezers, hammering techniques, and memorable pieces of jewelry.  It was a lot of hard work, but Akis was an excellent guide, eternally patient and very attentive to everyone.  His warm spirit and drive kept the students going at a steady pace and eager to learn more each day.  He left a lasting impression on everyone and we all look forward to having him back again some time soon.

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  1. ALWAYS LOOK FOR A NEW CHALLENGE IN ORDER TO KEEP IMPROVING

I think that challenging yourself continuously is very important. You can only move forward, if you force yourself to learn new things. If you keep acting only in your comfort zone, you will stay at the same point constantly.

Wether it is on a general professional or personal level, or just a single object I am working on – I always try to find new techniques or materials to explore. Some people want to focus on one same material or technique, which is also fine. The most important thing for me however is not to stop at the same point each time. Try to continue to surprise yourself, to go further than what you have imagined and find new, and different ways to do and to think.

In my latest series Diplopia I have used various techniques including 3D printing for the first time. It offered a complete new way of working to me. I think it is important to be open to a broad spectrum of techniques and materials, from traditional ones to new technologies. Be open to adapt to new opportunities in order to seize all the possibilities you are offered.

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2. HAVE A DREAM/A GOAL/A PLAN

 

 I believe that if you have a goal and you really want to achieve something, it is important that you frame it for yourself. If you keep seeing it clear in front of you, your whole body and mind will move towards it. Every decision and every move, leads you closer to your goal.

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3. BELIEVE THAT YOU CAN DO EVERYTHING!

Don´t hesitate to participate or apply because you think you are not experienced enough, or are too anxious about the possibility of failing. It is very tough to be self-confident in the art field. Especially as art jewelers, when we sometimes seem to float in an area between design, arts and crafts. Thus, it is such a satisfaction to achieve something that you did not think you could do. Those moments keep you going and help you to move on, so strive for them.

This year I won the “Eligius-Schmuckpreis 2016”. When I decided to apply I really did not have high hopes to get chosen, since I had just finished my studies and moved to Vienna a few months earlier. I decided to give it a shot anyway since it can´t hurt. Eventually I won the prize, which was an amazing opportunity and honor. I realized that I was wrong in not believing in my chances. We can always find reasons not to do things, but those will keep us from engaging in great possibilities and if we just try, we might be proven wrong. And also: failing is a learning experience too!

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4. HAVE HIGH AIMS

 

Don´t limit yourself and your ideas. At first, for every idea and every plan you should aim as high as you can. Let your ideas and thoughts develop free from limitations. Step by step you can try to find solutions for realizing them or for solving the problems or for finding other, easier ways to get where you want to.

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5. BE OPEN AND COURAGEOUS FOR NEW POSSIBILITIES

 

Have a plan, a dream, but don´t stick to it irrevocably. Often you need to change, adjust or adapt your plans a little. Maybe this will lead to steps that you did not plan in advance, but they might just lead you to another route on the way to your goal. If there are chances, you have to catch them.

At the beginning of my educational path as a jeweler I could not have imagined where my way would lead. I had not planned on doing my bachelors in Florence and I never thought I would complete my masters degree in the US. I am incredibly happy that I took the chances as they came, as those where the most valuable experiences of my whole life.

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6. DISAPPOINTMENTS ARE PART OF THE GAME

In my second year of grad school one of my art professors told me about his “folder of rejections”. It was a huge, stuffed folder that he kept. Over the years he collected every letter of refusal he received and put it in this folder. He is a successful artist today, but he assured me that for each time he got accepted for an exhibition or a job, he probably got rejected 10 times or more. Sometimes it can be very hard to take a rejection or a failure. You start questioning everything, asking yourself why you didn’t choose another career and worry that all your hard work ends in despair. Don´t be afraid to fail, don´t let it bring you down, there will be a next time and it will be worth it!

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7. HAVE FUN!

The best way to produce good work is to enjoy doing it. It will be easy for you to work hard and a lot if it doesn´t just feel like work. This works best if you can create a surrounding that comforts you. Make yourself a home in your studio and work close to people you like! I have always shared my studio with other artists. It was the best way to stay motivated when I got lost in my process, or when I was tired. I can ask my mates for suggestions and I even learn while trying to help them. If you talk, discuss, dream and phantasize together, your ideas will float and flourish in a way you can never achieve if you just sit by yourself. It is fun to work until late if you can have little breaks together and encourage each other to go on for one more hour.

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8. JOIN FORCES

Since April 2016 I am a Member of Atelier Stoss im Himmel. We are 8 artists that share a workspace and have a common exhibition space, where we have a showroom and organize shows. It is a beautiful space, equipped with all the tools we need to work and the possibility to split duties and responsibilities. None of us could afford anything close to this by themselves and of course, it is much more fun together.

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Lena Grabher is a Vienna-based contemporary jeweler. She started her education in Vienna where she accomplished her apprenticeship examination as a goldsmith. She completed her BFA degree in Florence at ALCHIMIA contemporary jewelry school in 2013, to continue her studies in Metals at the State University of New York at New Paltz, where she received her MFA in May 2015. Since 2016 she is a Member of Atelier STOSSimHIMMEL and teaches gold and silversmithing techniques at the Wiener Goldschmiedelehrgang. Lena has developed an experimental way of working that is driven by an urge to discover and explore the subject of jewelry on many levels. Her latest work is entitled DIPLOPIA and was currently awarded with the prestigious Eligius – Schmuckpreis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Polene, 2015, wood.

Weapons of Perfection, Lilian Mattuschka’s show in Florence and her graduate project for her MFA with Alchimia, was finely curated. It took place at Chiasso Perduto, an exhibition space in Florence open to different disciplines.

Here are a few things we have learned from her exhibition.

If you have a very characterized space, clean it as much as possible of any unnecessary element and play and relate to its architecture. Using a minimum amount of outsourced material (pedestals or anything of the like) will create a more organic relation between your pieces and the architecture.

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Exhibithion view.

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Exhibition view.

When your collection has a rhythm, one of those rhythms that contribute to creating a narrative, do try to emphasize it and give it a form. The legibility of your artistic intentions will be enriched by it.

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Exhibition view.

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Handle, 2016, wood.

Play with your business card or any other additional element of the show. Thinking artistically or curatorially about every aspect of the exhibition is paramount if you want to seduce your audience (and above all potential client).

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Business-cards as smile-mask.

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Exhibithion view.

If your work has a certain variety, do support that with different display methods. Here, video alternates with jewelry, the latter presented in many ways that followed form. “Some were shown in nicchie, others just on the wall, hanging from the ceiling with transparent fill, some were flying, some others were shown in boxes similar to those you would use to store weapons. Also the videos were all shown in different ways: on a computer screen, projected on a mapped wall, or in a little framed iPad. The exhibition was really playing with opposites, the pieces that were speaking of impositions or encourage physical corrections were the ones flying; they seemed like birds, or angels”.

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Silenziatore, 2016, video coming along a jewelry piece by the same title. Made in collaboration with Piero Aricó.

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Weapons of Perfection, 2016, realized in collabiration with Luca Maoceri. Performers: Giulietta Evans, Andrea Bertocci, Flavia Bardelloni, Benedetta Rustici, Piero Aricó and Viola Mattuschka.

Give a lot of thought to the way you use light. Lilian here decided to work with very low lights, to emphasize the material qualities of the wood and dramatize the space by playing with their shadows.

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Die Armee, 2016, installation, wood.

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Die Armee, 2016, installation, wood.

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Polene, 2015, wood.

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Smile, 2016, plexiglass-wood-iron.

Remember to create a space for reading, drinking and talking outside of the exhibition (or at least so in winter) if you want the exhibition to be a more silent space of contemplation.

And do mind: openings are for quick chats, while it is the following days that more engaged conversations can happen. So be there for the duration of the show if you can!

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Exhibition view.

Article originally posted at Alchimia – How to Make an Exhibition (in Florence) #2 Lillian Mattuschka

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Untitled, neckpiece, 2011. Paper, silver, glue, graphite, color, fabric, 350X300X80mm.

DM: Why jewellery?

AC: Difficult question, I cannot give a clear answer for the reason that I chose this field. As many things in life it just happened. I come from a family that is deeply involved with the arts, so in a way it was always obvious to me that I would engage in the arts, and consequently apply to the Bezalel Academy, at that time the only art academy in Israel.

I did not want to study at the Fine Arts Department. At the time it was too conceptual for me and too distant from the actual work with materials. I believed that the real excitement was taking place at the crafts departments. I knew I was attracted to something that had to do with technical and material understanding. So I applied to the Ceramics and Jewellery Departments (then combined jewellery and clothing). During the exams I decided for jewellery, maybe because of the diverse variety of different materials that where available for practice at the department. At the beginning I thought that jewellery was a kind of miniature sculpture, and only during my studies with Vered Kaminsky as my mentor I really engaged with the deeper meaning of jewellery, with what it represents and with what makes jewellery different from object making.

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Attai Chen’s workshop

DM: You studied at Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Tel Aviv and the Munich Academy of Fine Arts. Can you walk me through the difference between these two BFA and MFA studies?

 AC: After my BFA at Bezalel I decided to continue my studies at the Munich Academy because of my interest in Otto Kuenzli and his work. It was quite a shock at the beginning. I was used to a system (Bezalel) where you have different subjects, different teachers, assignments, exams and such. You are on a constant stress level of short term deadlines. However, in Munich the system was based on Master classes ( the old 19th century academy discipline) with one professor, no exams, no classes, absolute freedom, you could practically do whatever you wanted, set your own schedule (or almost never show up), the only rule was to be present on Wednesday mornings class-meetings where one of the students had to present something. It could range from introducing the project that one was currently working on, to a film, a lecture or anything that the student would want to show. I myself had maybe 5 such meetings during my 4 years of study. You were not obliged to have many interviews with the professor either. The idea was to keep you quite alone with your art. No one gets involved or asks regarding your work if you are not asking for it. Of course you can always ask the fellow students for their opinion. I guess that was professor Kuenzli’s policy. However, it doesn’t mean that you were not under constant pressure. The pressure was different this time, it came from inside, from yourself, from seeing the achievements of your fellow students, or from knowing about the brilliant students of the past. The presence or the charisma of Otto was always there even when he was not physically around, showing us a perfectionistic and highly demanding way of doing things.

I guess that part of the success of the class was in the amazing ability of Otto to attract and choose interesting, talented and hardworking people for the group, and to construct a challenging environment with them.

DM: Do you think you became an artist there, in Munich?

AC: I don’t really know what it means to be an artist or not. As I said before, growing up in an artistic family there was almost no doubt what I would become or be occupied with. When we travelled while I was a kid, there was never a normal hotel, or seaside vacation, rather there were exhibitions, old churches, second-hand antique shops and such, most of the together activities were dealing with art in one way or the other. But when I think of it now, I don’t know the answer, am I an artist? It sounds so stigmatic and “framing” to use a defined title for what I do, maybe I am an artist because this is the language that I was raised in, I am not sure, in the end the best way to describe myself would be a maker, as right now I am working with my hands physical materials, but this can also be subject to change one day.

DM: What did the encounter with Otto Kunzli and the Munich class change in your perception of jewellery and your role as an artist?

AC: I think that there, also because of how much jewellery we were exposed to, I have matured the confidence to work with what I choose and how I choose. It took a great deal of effort to understand that anything can be jewellery if it is made in a good and convincing way, and if it communicates with the field.

DM: In an interview once, you mentioned how you create in dialogue with materials: can you explain this dialogue more in detail?

AC: I can explain this using as an example my graduation work in Bezalel. This work originated as an investigatory research into what the place of materials and craftsmanship is in today’s world, one that is increasingly becoming digital, virtual and without substance. I started the project with one ounce of gold which I transformed and worked with for about 3 months.The idea was that I would create one object, then I would melt it and from the same material I would create the next object while digitally documenting the process. This allowed me to work again and again with the same amount of material, to enjoy the experience of investing into this material potentially almost endlessly.

This process started with an idea, a concept, then the material itself and the encounter with it showed me the way and led me through the project. So in this case the head started the process, while after the hands and the experience with the actual material took over.

Another example is my series of forgotten things. In this series I have first created my “raw material”: I tried to find my own way to work with a sheet of silver. I have defused few thin sheets of silver together, and then I have put it through the ruling mill. It resulted with a thin cracked sheet of silver. From these fragments I started to build shapes, by assembling and defusing them together.

In a sense I quite often work with this method; first creating my own “raw material” then cutting it and creating with it structures. Working first without a clear and defined idea of how it should be shaped or into what it should evolve. The pieces grow from the actual active dialogue that develops while working, I bring ideas, fillings, references and the material brings its unique characteristics.

DM: Crises and success. How do you cope with both and what do they mean in your life?

AC: Crises, if you survive it, is what brings you forward. It is a hard experience that I am confronted with again and again. It is quite painful, often it feels like there will be no way out, but then at one point there is. Something opens and a new path is revealed. When I arrived in Munich I was very much in a crises, in fact during my first two years I suffered from it. I did not understand why I was there, nothing was as what I have expected. I thought I would have a mentor, one that will show me a clear path to follow but there was none. One decision probably kept me on the correct path leading me out of the stagnation, I was going every day to the studio and I was trying to work. I have experimented with different things and materials until from an unexpected direction I found the path that intrigued me enough to continue to follow it.

Success, Otto Kuenzli once told me: success is like a knife on your throat. It is true, I experienced it when I got the Herbert Hoffmann prize, being still a student. Of course I was happy and proud, but at the same time came the unbearable pressure, first from myself and then from the outside,

from galleries, collectors, customers. The feeling that from now on I had to keep a serried level of work and keep on producing was stressful. What is expected of me? Do I need to continue working on the same theme? How can I afford to make a new body of work that might not be as good or as attractive as the previous one? I know a few artists who after a huge success could not work for years or others that changed their profession.

DM: Titles: I noted that some of your series just remain untitled, others have quite complex titles. What do the titles add to your work ? A tiny example: “Forgive me father for I have sinned” and “free radicals”. As an image, these pieces seem very similar in structure and material, only the colors differ substantially.

AC: Sometimes a piece needs to have a title, it creates a kind of reference to other things that may had something to do with the creation of the piece, a reference to an art piece, a song, a story and such. Sometimes a title is only a title to name a thing that gives another facet to its existence. Sometimes a title contains a secret that is known only to myself. Like in the title that you have quoted “Forgive me father for I have sinned. For this one I was inspired by a triptych of Damien Hirst where 3 black canvases were created from a million of dead flies. I have made a couple of pieces out of paper with color and graphite. On the paper I have drawn and written things that I shredded and compiled together into a new composition. Maybe in this way I am exposing secrets that are no longer readable yet still are there. Like when you get a document from the bank with a new pin code that after memorizing you shred and dispose of, yet the pieces continue to exist.

DM: Choosing to be a jewellery artist by profession includes developing a vision for your professional life. Can you define this vision ?

 AC: I do not have a clear vision, at least not one that I consciously know of.

I didn’t choose to become a jewellery artist, I started to study jewellery out of curiosity, coincidences and the unique challenges that it presented me with. Since then I just went along with it, made some decisions on the way that pushed me further to deepen my involvement with jewellery making. Now I do it because it is still an interesting form of expression for me, I am still discovering new and different facets in the world of jewellery making that intrigue me and make me continue to engage with it. I think that for me jewellery represents a challenge that exists in a triangular relationship: investigation of the material and craftsmanship, artistic ideas & emotions and the human body.

DM: Could jewellery ever be more than a supplement?

I think that everything is a supplement, meaning: don’t all things exist for us only in relationship to us?

Jewellery is a form of communication, an object that relates in most of the cases to the human body. Some are wearable some are not, they all relate to the body by their definition. However, most of the time they are not worn, they do have an independent life. In some cases this means that the pieces can act as objects if they are being treated as such. The fascinating thing about jewellery is that some of the pieces do exist in this dual form, they appear in one form while shown independently and in another when they are worn.

Attai Chen (b. 1979 in Jerusalem, Israel) is a jewellery artist. Since 2007 he lives and works in Munich, Germany. In 2006 Chen received a BFA in jewellery and fashion from the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem.

In 2012 he received an MFA in jewellery from the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich, tutored by professor Otto Künzli.

Since 2011, Chen has taught, given workshops and lectures in several Academies and Institutions; among them the Masters of Design program at Shenkar College of Engineering and Design, Ramat- Gan (IL), HDK-The School of Design and Crafts, Gothenburg (SW), the Dep. of Jewellery and Fasion at the Bezalel Academy of Art and Desigen, Jerusalem(IL).

In the last years Chen was awarded several grants and prizes, among them: the 2011 “Herbert Hofmann” prize (DE); 2012 Oberbayerischer prize for Applied Arts (DE); 2014“Andy” prize (IL).

His work is part of several collections, including: Arkansas Arts Center, Arkansas (US); the Coda Museum, Apeldoorn (NL); the Donna Schneier Collection, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (US); the Rotasa Foundation, California, (US); the Helen Drutt Collection, Philadelphia; the International Design Museum Munich (DE); the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Tel-Aviv (IL); the Israeli Museum of Art, Jerusalem (IL)

Article originally posted at Alchimia – Attai Chen in conversation with Doris Manninger

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  1. NEVER STOP MOVING

Life has a movement and a rhythm. Never stop moving. Keep on track, and continue doing the things you do with or around your art. Even when you are not in a creative period of your life, do things that will keep your mind and hands trained and fed. Go to museums, see a movie, read a book, have a nice conversation with a friend, pause on your thoughts and your surroundings. Dance!

  1. THE HOLY TRINITY FOR ME IS: PERSISTENCE, PATIENCE & TRUST

Trust yourself, your capacities and your knowledge. Be patient because things need time. Be persistent and faithful to your art. Do not give up easily, otherwise you will never complete anything.

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  1. TAKE RISKS

If you really want something but it doesn’t exist yet, just create it by yourself. Take the risk and develop something from zero. Nobody is an expert in everything so if you need help try to find the right people to help you, learn from them, collaborate with them. You can make happen any idea that passes through your mind. Do not forget that we are creators and communicators.

 

  1. BE CURIOUS, BE HONEST…AND DREAM

Dreaming is about respecting your curiosity and your ideas. Honesty is about following your instinct. Being curious is about learning and discovering new things and possibilities. Without dreaming and without being curious it is difficult to go ahead. Art is like our bodies that never lie, so don’t forget to be honest with yourself and with your art.

5. ART NEEDS SACRIFICES, BUT BE AWARE OF WHAT KIND OF SACRIFICES YOU DO NOT TO GET TOO FAR FROM YOUR ART

In 2011, when I opened Anamma studio, I hadn’t realized the sacrifices that I had to do for my art. The studio is like a baby that needs all of my attention. The result was that for some years I didn’t have the time and the energy to create my jewellery. Now that the baby is already a child of 5 years old, I have realized that during its childhood I learned immensely through teaching, organizing workshops and curating student exhibitions. Learning never stops and goes in multiple directions. All of this brought me closer to my art. Only now I understand better my way of doing things, and what is surprising is that after this some things are coming out more naturally.

When I graduated from Alchimia in 2010, I moved to my home city, Athens. I was feeling alone and lost. The only thing that I was thinking about was how to share my art that I was so in love with. There are a lot of ways to do that. For me, the dream started to take form in 2011. I created a studio, Anamma, where people could basically come and follow classes about contemporary jewellery. This came out of my need to share and exchange my precious knowledge and experience in jewellery. But Anamma is not only about that. Students can develop individual and collective projects, present their work in annual exhibitions, visit together important exhibitions and discover the work of other artists…this list is fortunately long and always open to changes. That is what Anamma is all about.

Since 2011, I create, teach, invite artists from around the world, participate in exhibitions and curate exhibitions. In July of 2016, together with Greek jewellery artists Erato Kouloumpi, Ioanna Natsikou & Niki Stylianou, we formed the Anclastics group. With it we organized the first Athens Jewelry Week in order to inform and sensibilize the public on issues related to contemporary jewellery. And the story goes on…

For more information:

Facebook: Anastasia Kandaraki

Anamma

Is This Jewelry?

Athens Jewelry Week